Traductions / Translations

2004

Cuentos: cuentos del pais incierto; cuentos ingleses; cuentos ine ditos, présentation et traduction par Omar Alvarez Salas, Mexico, Siglo XXI, 2004, 248 p.

Les Cuentos de Jacques Ferron viennent de paraître au Mexique, traduits par Omar Alvarez Salas.
Avec la permission des éditions Hurtubise-HMH, cette première traduction espagnole des Contes de Ferron fut lancée à la Foire internationale du Livre de Guadalajara, tenue l'automne dernier. Toute la littérature du Québec y était à l'honneur.

Dans sa préface, "Jacques Ferron y la cimentacion del "Pais incierto", le traducteur présente "el genial contraparte boreal de Jorge Luis Borges"! Dans ses notes, il précise le sens de certains jeux de mots de Ferron, comme ses amusantes translittérations d'expressions anglaises: "cuiquelounche" devient "fastfud" (fast food) en espagnol.


1973

Papá Boss, traducción de Leo-Paul Desaulniers, Hernán Loyola, prólogo de Leo-Paul Desaulniers, Santiago (Chili), Nascimento, coll. "Biblioteca Popular",1973, 130 p.

"Un jour de décembre 1971, Hernán Loyola, directeur littéraire des éditions Nascimento, m’avait fait part de son désir d’inclure un titre québécois dans sa "Biblioteca Popular", une collection de poche réunissant des chefs-d’œuvre de la littérature latino-américaine et mondiale. Spontanément, j’ai dit : Ferron. Nascimento appartenait au Parti Communiste du Chili et son propos, à l’exemple de la politique que suivait Cuba, était de rendre le livre accessible aux masses populaires, à prix modique.

Le tirage était énorme, des centaines de milliers d’exemplaires; les livres de Nascimento n’étaient pas l’objet de lancements avec petits fours pour le jet-set littéraire, ils apparaissaient au petit matin blême dans les kiosques à journaux en même temps que El Mercurio du samedi, dont ils avaient d’ailleurs le prix." (Article de Léo-Paul Désaulniers publié dans Le Bulletin des amis de Jacques Ferron, 6, décembre 2001.



1984 The Penniless Redeemer, translated by Ray Ellenwood, Toronto, Exile Editions, 1984, 341 pages.
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The Penniless Redeemer


The Penniless Redeemer

A mocking and tender look at Québec in the time of Maurice Duplessis, The Penniless Redeemer is Ferron's most ambi-tious novel, a huge canvas after the manner of Hieronymus Bosch, where devils and angels mingle with politicians, prelates, painters and poets, where Borduas finds himself in purgatory with Cyrano de Bergerac, where Saint Dennys-Garneau goes to hell in search of a mysterious Eurydice, where young Frank Scot (sic) gets a social disease and turns Québécois. This edition also includes a translator's Afterword and extensive notes on characters and events.

An important, necessary, para-historical work, a demystification of our history and a systematic debunking of some shoddy heroes from our collective past. A fantastic and humorous analysis of the Québec psyche. A major work of our literature. Victor-Lévy Beaulieu.
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1984 Selected Tales, translated by Betty Bednarski, Toronto, Anansi, 1984, 256 p.
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Selected Tales


Selected Tales by Jacques Ferron

Thirty-seven sparkling classics of Quebec fiction, in new translations by Betty Bednarski, with an introduction and biographical notes.

Jacques Ferron’s stories are wonderful. Some are fantastic tall tales in which a bull turns into a lawer, or a lonely Alberta cow’s ghost longs for Quebec, or Ulysses comes back to Ithaca Corner, Ontario.

Ferron writes metaphysical fables, sketches of urban life, political satire, portraits of men and women in all walks of life, and wry comedies, with great originality and a profound sympathy for the human condition. These brief, charming tales are among the most celebrated works in modern Quebec literature.
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1981 The Cart, translated by Ray Ellenwood, Toronto, Exile Editions, 1981, 144 p.
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The Cart


The Cart

A tale about death and how it strikes a doctor, first through his patients and then his own person, leaving him absurdly stretched out in the street fit only for the rag and bone man. What happens when you change your person from I to him, your tense from present to past? This man travels to The Gates of Hell and back in a tipcart, across the, Jacques Cartier bridge. Jacques Ferron, a central figure in the Qujb6cois,cul-tural and political revolution, is one of the country's finest and most distinctive story tellers.
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1977 Quince Jam, translated by Ray Ellenwood, Toronto, Coach House, 1977, 262 p.
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Quince Jam
Papa Boss. Quince Jam

Two great novels in one volume. No novelist captured the history and imagination of Québec like Jacques Ferron. A practicing doctor among the Montréal south shore poor, the hero of Vallieres’ White Niggers of America, his political separatism was never shrill, but tempred by a soardonic comic view. Papa Boss is his vision of the annunciation of the new Messiah, son of Papa Boss, Lord of the Firmament of high finance and technology.

Quince Jam (and two other texts — Appendice to Quince Jam and Credit Due) deal with the problem of autonomy for Québec and the autonomy of the individual — the author’s sens of his own identity in his uncertain country. These are works of a prose artist unlike any on this continent.
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1976 Wild Roses, translated by Betty Bednarski, Toronto, McLelland and Stewart, 1976, 123 p.
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Wild Roses


Wild Roses

Wild Roses traces the frightening contours of a mind that yields to the deceptive sweetness of insanity. Searching beyond the limits of conventional points of view, the prize-wining novel by Quebec’s foremost literary figure enters the chaotic world of one man’s tortured psyche, unfolding a fabric of dark mysteries, hidden meanings, and sinister forces. The shadows claim their victims, but the man’s daughter, with the help of a wise old woman, struggles to break the spell of madness and death that hovers over her father’s house and that stretches its tentacles from Montreal to Moncton, to Casablanca.

Written with astounding candour and great delicacy of feeling, Jacques Ferron’s Wild Roses was awarded the 1972 Prix France-Québec and has been hailed as one of his beautiful books. It is translated here with perception and fidelity, along with the thematicaly linked Love Letter and Introduction>, included in the original French edition. The two works comprise a unique literary achievement, full of nobility and tragic grandeur.

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1975 The Saint Elias, translated by Pierre Cloutier, Montreal, Harvest House, 1975, p. 145.
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The Saint Elias


The Saint Elias

The Saint Elias is named for a trading barque built in the early nineteenth century by the people of Batiscan on the North Shore of the St.Lawrence, between Montreal and Quebec city. For these colonized villagers the barque is a symbol of freedom — an opening to the world of Europe, Africa, international trade, good wine and ideas — an opportunity to turn their backs on their native land which is allegedly teeming with corruption and foreign control. This chronicle has the Voltairean quality which the writing of Ferron so often exhibits. Physician, bishop, farmer, villager, wencher and wench, the convent-bred and the agnostic, combine to give us a picture of the nineteenth century French-Canadian village community. The Saint Elias is a Canadian "Fiddler on the Roof" that abounds in humour and skirts the edge of tragedy.

Jacques Ferron sees himself and other novelists as "impatient historians," a view which is aptly demonstrated in The Saint Elias. John Grube too, in his review of The Saint Elias, has commented on its potent politico-religious implications. But as he remarked " …On Ferron's hands it becomes a fascinating and slightly scandalous series of quarrels and love affairs, carried along by his natural gift as a story-teller. While the main characters, Dr. Fauteux for example, are purely imaginary and marvellous fictional creations, the book is peppered with mischievous references to real people" (Books in Canada).
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1975 The Juneberry Three, translated by Raymond Y. Chamberlain, Montreal, Harvest House, 1975, 157 p.
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The Juneberry Three


The Juneberry Three

Named after the first tree to blossom in the spring and the first to die in the fall, The Juneberry Tree is a modern day Alice in Won-derland. The young heroine of this delightful tale is named Tinamer. Through her eyes we see a whole new universe. It is polarized, di-vided by the family home in Longueuil. In the back of the house is the "good side of things," a phantasy-world which Tinamer inherits from her father's imagination, the "Sea of Tranquil-lity" separating the past from the dream world. In the front of the house is the "bad side of things." Tinamer's father leaves by the front door to go to work, crossing the street to where mechanization taints the world of dream. A day comes however, when Tinamer must go by the "bad side of things" to go to school. She discovers that things are neither com-pletely good nor completely bad, representing a farewell to childhood, that happy state of abso-lutes.

It is rare that an author is apotheosized in mid-career. But so prolific is Jacques Ferron, and such is the race of events in modern Quebec, that the critic and Professor of Medieval Literature at Laval University, Jean Marcel, has written a whole volume about Fer-ron, entitled Jacques Ferron malgré lui (Edi-tions du Jour, 1970). In the opening paragraph to this book Marcel states: "Thanks to Jac-ques Ferron, Quebec will be as well known in times to come as Arabia."
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1973 Dr. Cotnoir, translated by Pierre Cloutier, Montreal, Harvest House, 1973, 86 p.
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Dr. Cotnoir


Dr. Cotnoir

Dr. Cotnoir is a short novel which was published at the same time as Ferron's first collection of short stories, Contes du pays incertain in 1962. The sto-ries earned him a Governor General’s Award in that year, while Dr. Cotnoir remained virtually unnoticed until the critics Réjean Robidoux and André Renaud gave it high praise in their book, Le Roman canadien-français du vingtième siècle (Ottawa, 1966).

According to Ben-Zion Shek, Ferron, himself "has indicated that models for the two major characters of his novel, Cotnoir and Emmanuel, were taken from real life. A Dr. Cotnoir preceded Ferron in his medi-cal practice in the Gaspé before the author opened an office in Ville Jacques-Cartier, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence. The action of the novel is set in the latter area in nearby, middle-class Longueuil, where the fictional Cotnoir lives and in the work-ing-class suburbs known first as Longueuil Annex and then as Ville-Jacques-Cartier, where Dr. Cotnoir's entire clientel resides. The character, Cotnoir, is ob-viously a composite of the original model and the au-thor himself."
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1972 Tales from the Uncertain Country, translated by Betty Bednarski, Toronto, Anansi, 1972, p. 101.
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Tales from the Uncertain Country


Tales from the Uncertain Country

This collection of crisp, incisive and highly original stories by a widely acknowledged master of Quebec fiction appears in a translation that preserves Ferron’s idiosyncracy and charm. An important addition to the body of Quebec literature available to English-speaking readers, it gives us a new vantage-point from which to view not only Quebec but the rest of Canada.

Did you know that one the greatest of contemporary French short-story writers is living in Quebec and that his name is Jacques Ferron ? If not, it is high time you did.

Gilles Marcotte, La Presse.

Ferron the mysterious ! as secretive as his works, and as engaging ; in whose presence our wits are sharpened even the we are being hood winked !

Réginald Martel, La Presse.

This most discret of authors writes with the violence of the meek — and that is the most dangerous kind of all.

Roger Duhamel, La Patrie.
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Notre équipe
Rédaction et conception générales : Luc Gauvreau
Collaborateurs : Pierre Cantin, André Berger, Marcel Olscamp avec le soutien et les encouragements de Marie et de Martine Ferron, et l'aide financière du groupe de recherche "Éditer Ferron" et de la Fondation du Prêt d'honneur de la Société Saint-Jean-Baptsite
Conception et réalisation du site Internet par Vortex Solution